A recent Inc. article stated that high value work is now done more by teams than individuals with “type A” characteristics. The article went on to say that to solve complex problems, you don’t need the best people. You need the best teams, and that means changing the way we evaluate, recruit, manage, and train employees. Put simply, working in a team takes different skills than working alone.

Building the best team involves the following.

  1. Diversity. We hear this word often, but do we truly understand what it means or what it takes to build a diverse team? If companies only hire those from similar backgrounds, how will this add benefit in the long run? Inc. points out that instead of looking for comfort, you should be creating an environment where people expect to have their perspectives challenged by people who look, talk, and think differently.
  2. Sharing the stage. The article refers to this as social sensitivity. What it means is each team member has the ability to share their ideas, feedback and feels comfortable doing so. Basically, no assholes allowed. The article also pointed out that strong team performance depends on the number of women in the group. The women of 834, find this extremely interesting…and also we told you so.
  3. Interaction. Time together is key. Gathering around a table and talking, brainstorming and tossing around concepts is what makes a strong team. So often we lose the human aspect of communication and resort to email, telephone or gchats/messenger/texts, etc. High quality interaction builds higher levels of trust and produces more creative work.

Creating the right team culture means changing the way you find and recruit talent. Stop looking at degrees, schools and previous positions. Ask yourself the following questions.

  • How will they fit into our company culture?
  • Can they work in a team environment?
  • Do they respect others?
  • Is their background diverse?

Companies need to change the way they approach success and that starts at the team level.

Source: Inc. Magazine

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